Coping With Diagnosis

This section is for discussions with other women who have probably been through the same signs/symptoms that you may be experiencing. Please note, we cannot offer medical advice and encourage members to discuss their concerns with their doctors. New members, come on in and introduce yourself!
User avatar
caryn
Forum Moderator
Posts: 10203
Joined: Fri Jun 25, 2004 06:36 am

Re: Coping With Diagnosis

Postby caryn » Mon Dec 01, 2014 05:55 pm

Welcome Earthside, Fiona!
Science! The articles you don't want to miss:
The Preeclampsia Puzzle (New Yorker) and Silent Struggle: A New Theory of Pregnancy (New York Times)
Looking for recent articles and studies?
A chance to participate in research? For us on Facebook or Twitter?

Caryn, @carynjrogers, who is not a doctor and who talks about science stuff *way* too much
DS Oscar born by emergent C-section at 34 weeks for fetal indicators, due to severe PE
DD Bridget born by C-section after water broke at 39 weeks after a healthy pregnancy

alviarin
Forum Moderator
Posts: 1809
Joined: Tue Apr 18, 2006 12:56 am
Location: Texas

Re: Coping With Diagnosis

Postby alviarin » Sat Nov 29, 2014 08:32 pm

Congratulations!!! Welcome baby Fiona! Thanks for sharing the picture, she's beautiful!

How are you feeling? I'm glad you had a good birth experience but sometimes preeclampsia worsens after delivery. I wanted to mention just in case.

I hope you had a Happy Thanksgiving!
Hypothyroid mom to
Connor (severe pre-e at 38 weeks)
Claire (dx'd with pre-e and induction at 37 weeks)
Annabelle (chronic HTN & GD, superimposed pre-e @34 weeks, induction @37 weeks)

isjocelyns
Registered User
Posts: 3
Joined: Thu Nov 06, 2014 11:13 am

Re: Coping With Diagnosis

Postby isjocelyns » Wed Nov 26, 2014 09:33 pm

Hello Ladies,

Sorry this post took so long. We finally have had some time to settle in at home, and this is the first time I have had a chance to sit at the computer!

So, we went in on Monday, November 10th, thinking that we would be expecting a baby that day or the next. I knew that my doctor would be administering a dose of Cytotec, vaginally, and then we figured it would be on to pitocin. However, after lab work came back better than it had been a few days before, and the baby and my blood pressure were looking good, he decided that we would try two rounds on Cytotec throughout the day; see where my cervix was; and then he would send us home to see how things progressed on their own. My husband and I were pleasantly surprised! Given that I was asymptomatic and everything else was looking better than anticipated, he would try and honor our wishes of a least invasive birth; however, I needed to monitor my blood pressure; come in if I had any symptoms at all; and if I did not go into labor on my own before Wednesday morning, we would be back for induction, round two.

We left Monday night, and I was having mild, yet consistent contractions. My cervix had thinned out significantly, but I was only a centimeter dilated. By Tuesday morning, the contractions had lost their consistency and seemed to disappear midday, much to my disappoint. My husband and I went out to lunch and the store, late in the afternoon, and the contractions returned for about 30 seconds to 90 seconds every five to eight minutes, but I didn't want to get my hopes up. My doula arranged for me to go to the birth center for acupuncture, and I am not certain if that was the magic contraction sticky dust or not, but the contractions stayed consistent, yet mild throughout the night and into the morning. When I we went back to the hospital Wednesday morning, my cervix was almost entirely effaced and was three centimeters dilated. We all decided to do one more round Cytotec, to move things along, and skip the pitocin since I was progressing on my own and my labs and the baby were still looking good.

All day, the contractions stayed mild yet consistent. I definitely could sense back labor, despite the modified inversions I had been doing and yoga, but nothing hurt too bad. Around 6:00, right before the doctor was going to come back to break my water, it broke on it's own and I was bouncing around on the birthing ball. I was still joking with the nurse and our doctor about it, as I got cleaned up and went into the tub. At that point I was five centimeters, so I thought it would take a while still, and slowly the contractions were starting to intensify. When my doula arrive at 6:30, I was definitely in active labor and I felt the urge to poop. However, all I could think was that it was way too soon to push, so I got out of the tub and sat on the toilet for awhile (Sorry, a little TMI!). Then a bit after 7:00 that urge just was too much ignore. I got on my hands and knees on the bed, because it was the only position comfortable on my back at that point, and apparently looked like I was starting to push. Our doula had the nurse check, and sure enough I was fully dilated and our baby's head was visible. I spent the next 30-40 minutes pushing, and at 7:50 PM, our beautiful daughter, Fiona, was born! She weighed 7 pounds 3 ounces and was 20 inches long, in pitch perfect health! We felt so blessed that everything went so swimmingly, with little drugs or intervention, and that she and I were healthy and safe in the end.

I know that it was because of the support of family, friends, the medical staff, our doula, the midwives from the birth center, and the information and support I found on here, that I was able to have such a successful and happy delivery, so thank you ladies for sharing your stories! I know that I am very lucky and fortunate to have the birth experience I had, and that my baby and I are happy and well. I am now hoping that I, and friends I know who have had other experiences with preeclampsia, can work with the birth center on educating other high-risk women on things like preeclampsia and the options available to help them achieve their birth goals or to cope with their diagnoses.

Thank you again, to you ladies, this forum, and the Preeclampsia Foundation!

Jocelyn

Image

Image

MomTimesThree
Forum Moderator
Posts: 598
Joined: Sat Feb 11, 2012 3:54 pm

Re: Coping With Diagnosis

Postby MomTimesThree » Wed Nov 12, 2014 05:42 am

Hoping all went well yesterday! Update when you're able.

Best,
Lauren
2008-Our Baby Girl, PTL born too early at 30w6d, Fought so hard... Forever Loved & Missed
2010- Lil' Bro, Pre-E at 29 weeks... Induced at 36w6d, Born 37w
2012- Lil' Sis, Super-imposed pre-e at 25 weeks, PTL & GD at 35 weeks, Evicted 36w

alviarin
Forum Moderator
Posts: 1809
Joined: Tue Apr 18, 2006 12:56 am
Location: Texas

Re: Coping With Diagnosis

Postby alviarin » Sun Nov 09, 2014 11:08 pm

For me personally, the main impact of magnesium sulfate was not being able to get up and walk around due to fall risk. It did feel a lil' warm at the injection site going in, but ice cubes/cold cloths can help with that feeling. I know it can make some feel groggy, but that wasn't really a problem for me. I was still able to breastfeed after delivery.

Good luck tomorrow!
Hypothyroid mom to
Connor (severe pre-e at 38 weeks)
Claire (dx'd with pre-e and induction at 37 weeks)
Annabelle (chronic HTN & GD, superimposed pre-e @34 weeks, induction @37 weeks)

KetchupSpud
Registered User
Posts: 30
Joined: Sun Nov 02, 2014 8:57 pm

Re: Coping With Diagnosis

Postby KetchupSpud » Sat Nov 08, 2014 10:38 pm

I didn't labor at all, let alone with mag, so nothing to share there, but I wanted to tell you that I know exactly how you feel about not knowing whether any of the pains I felt were pregnancy related or not. I did end up having contractions at one point during my bedrest, and for me they started off as an odd pain. It lasted longer than a kick, but it was right where my one son was (very low and pretty much centered) and so I chalked it up to him at first. After a little bit I remember telling my husband, "Either he's really upset about something or these are contractions." Then they got more intense and were very obvious. The pain ramped up and then back down again - that's what was the tell-tale sign for me. It also seemed to spread up my stomach.

Of course, your experience may be completely different, but thought I'd share mine.

I also wanted to tell you that, as much as this may not be what you wanted, and as scary as it is, you may find peace in knowing that you did what you had to do. There's something heroic about foregoing what you wanted to do what's best for your baby. I'm one of the people who has said for years that I'd get the meds as soon as humanly possible, but I've read and know plenty of people who have said otherwise. Some find that, once they have their baby, they don't care at all how it got there, but for others they have to mourn the loss of their dream of childbirth. So just know that, however you feel, it's normal and perfectly understandable and, as caryn said, completely out of your control. And, however it happens, you'll get to meet that baby soon! :)
Mama to Logan Patrick (8/23/14-8/26/14) & Bryce Anthony (8/23/14-9/13/14), frateral twins born at 23w5d due to severe pre-e turning into HELLP.
Hoping for a rainbow in Sept '16.

User avatar
caryn
Forum Moderator
Posts: 10203
Joined: Fri Jun 25, 2004 06:36 am

Re: Coping With Diagnosis

Postby caryn » Sat Nov 08, 2014 06:45 pm

Magnesium sulfate is via IV, and really reduces risk of seizure for preeclamptics - if you need it, you need it. There's been debate for years over whether or not preeclamptics who don't have severe features need it. That's because it's so hard to tell who's going to seize; some women report a headache and visual disturbances and then seize at pretty low pressures and some women can sustain high pressures with a lot of proteinuria for days and never develop a headache. If you search for posts from "blythe" I know she was stable enough for as close to a natural birth as possible and labored through mag sulfate at least once.

It's a muscle relaxant, so you become a fall risk, which can keep you in bed during labor. If you're kept on mag postpartum, it can mean you need help caring for your newborn since you're weak and dizzy and have trouble seeing (those last two because it relaxes the muscles in your *eyes*, which screws with your balance.) I had it for 5 days (2 before delivery, 3 after) but my baby was in NICU and hopefully yours will not be, so I'm not sure how that would be managed. I've also never labored - even with my last easy pregnancy, I never even went into labor, and when PROM hit at 39 weeks I was 0% dilated, 0% effaced, with a surgical scar - so I hope someone who has labored on mag can give you more information about that!
Science! The articles you don't want to miss:
The Preeclampsia Puzzle (New Yorker) and Silent Struggle: A New Theory of Pregnancy (New York Times)
Looking for recent articles and studies?
A chance to participate in research? For us on Facebook or Twitter?

Caryn, @carynjrogers, who is not a doctor and who talks about science stuff *way* too much
DS Oscar born by emergent C-section at 34 weeks for fetal indicators, due to severe PE
DD Bridget born by C-section after water broke at 39 weeks after a healthy pregnancy

isjocelyns
Registered User
Posts: 3
Joined: Thu Nov 06, 2014 11:13 am

Re: Coping With Diagnosis

Postby isjocelyns » Sat Nov 08, 2014 12:19 am

Thanks, ladies, for the responses. No induction yesterday, but on Monday, yes. My cervix was soft today, and I was dilated one centimeter, so the midwives who have been checking with me still, swept my membranes (Which I heard can be terrible, and I didn't feel a thing!). Hopefully that might move things along, but I am terrible gauge of what is pregnancy related cramping or contractions and what I just always assume is my IBS/IBD acting up. Therefore, I am not too sure anything is happening.

Either way, the end is in sight, and I just had this major rush of relief yesterday. Just feeling more at peace.

Currently, I am rewriting my birth plan. My OB said that depending on my lab results Monday morning, they might decide to administer magnesium. What can anyone tell me about how that could change things for me and baby during birth and post partum?

User avatar
caryn
Forum Moderator
Posts: 10203
Joined: Fri Jun 25, 2004 06:36 am

Re: Coping With Diagnosis

Postby caryn » Fri Nov 07, 2014 05:44 pm

Welcome - I'm glad you've found us.

I too had hoped for a spontaneous vaginal delivery myself, with my first, and got every intervention in the book instead. It took a few days to get my head around (precipitous onset, so I went from confirmed high readings to the hospital to surgery to the NICU in a little over 48h) and, for what it's worth, I found it really helpful to remember that this was just not under my control. Historically, lots and lots of women and babies just don't have that spontaneous healthy vaginal delivery, and not because of anything they did. You've probably got a hypervigilant immune system, for whatever reason, and while that has benefits for some of your overall health, it can make some things worse by predisposing you to chronic hypertension, autoimmune diseases, and preeclampsia. In the long run of parenting, though, preeclampsia can turn out to be not so much of a big deal. :)

What's happening with you today - induction, or a little more time?
Science! The articles you don't want to miss:
The Preeclampsia Puzzle (New Yorker) and Silent Struggle: A New Theory of Pregnancy (New York Times)
Looking for recent articles and studies?
A chance to participate in research? For us on Facebook or Twitter?

Caryn, @carynjrogers, who is not a doctor and who talks about science stuff *way* too much
DS Oscar born by emergent C-section at 34 weeks for fetal indicators, due to severe PE
DD Bridget born by C-section after water broke at 39 weeks after a healthy pregnancy

alviarin
Forum Moderator
Posts: 1809
Joined: Tue Apr 18, 2006 12:56 am
Location: Texas

Re: Coping With Diagnosis

Postby alviarin » Thu Nov 06, 2014 09:25 pm

Hi Jocelyn, welcome to the forums. I'm glad that you found us but sorry to hear you have preeclampsia.

With my first, I went from low risk to high risk due to preeclampsia practically overnight. I didn't even have one high pressure reading until my 38 week appointment. Which totally threw off my natural childbirth plan, so I definitely sympathize. I now know it is good to have a Plan A, Plan B, and maybe even a plan C!

Depending on whether or not you need a magnesium IV or not day of delivery might determine how mobile you are. Even though I was stuck in bed with my son on a magnesium sulfate IV due to rapidly worsening preeclampsia, I was still able to change positions in bed which helped. With my last two kiddos, my pressures were ok day of delivery, maybe because we delivered a little sooner or maybe because the epidural helped prevent any spikes due to pain so I was able to avoid IV magnesium sulfate. I declined an epidural with my first, but after 3 inductions, 2 with and epidural and one without I have to decide I definitely prefer with! Also I learned that if they need to perform an emergency c-section they can crank up the epidural instead of putting you under general anesthesia. Not to scare you, but even inductions don't always go as planned, and I wish it was something I had known about ahead of time.

Bedrest stinks, there are only so many books you can read or tv shows you can watch. Do you have any friends available during the day that you could call and check up on and maybe distract yourself a little?

I hope this helps, let us know if you have any more questions/concerns. And please update us on what the doctor says tomorrow!
Hypothyroid mom to
Connor (severe pre-e at 38 weeks)
Claire (dx'd with pre-e and induction at 37 weeks)
Annabelle (chronic HTN & GD, superimposed pre-e @34 weeks, induction @37 weeks)


Return to “Ask the Experienced”

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 4 guests